ChE 2011 - Syllabus

Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis/Chemical and Biological Engineering Process Analysis

Fall Semester 2013 - Tennessee Technological University, Department of Chemical Engineering

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 GENERAL INFORMATION

 PROJECTS 

 CATALOGUE INFORMATION

 EXAMS

 OBJECTIVE and STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 DOWNLOADS

 GRADING

 

 COURSE OUTLINE

 

 HOMEWORK SCHEDULE and INSTRUCTIONS

 

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Don’t skip class. If you have to miss class, let me know in advance.

 

CLASSROOM POLICY: Students having documentation of special needs must submit Accommodation Request Form to the Disability Services Office. Discuss these needs with the instructor so that the proper accommodations can be made.

ETHICAL CONDUCT: Copying answers from other students or from any other source is not considered ethical behavior.

 

CELL PHONE and TEXTING POLICY: All cell phones must be turned off unless you are expecting a genuine emergency call in which case your phone must be put on vibrate. If you receive a call you are to take the call outside of class. Absolutely no text messaging is permitted during class. Your cell is not to be used for any purpose in class unless authorized by the instructor.

 

COMPUTER USE IN CLASS: You are required to have your own laptop computer and encouraged to bring it to class and lab. No unauthorized use of your computer is permitted during class or lab, e.g. e-mail reading, sending or writing, web surfing, viewing or networking on Facebook, etc.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Time: Section 101, T, 3:00-4:50 PM, Clement Hall 212; Section 102, Th, 3:00-4:50 PM, Clement Hall 212

Section 001 and 003, MWF, 1:25-2:20 PM, Prescott Hall 205

Section 002, MWF, 2:30-3:25 PM, Prescott Hall 215

Instructor: Joseph J. Biernacki, Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering

Office: 312 Prescott Hall

Phone: 3667

Office Hours: see office hours schedule

Graduate Teaching Assistant: Brita Anderson (banderson42@students.tntech.edu)

Teaching Assistant Office Hours: TBA

Mole-si Coordinator: Marbin Pazos-Revilla (mpazos@tntech.edu)

Text:

R. L. Cerro, B. G. Higgins and S. Whitaker, Material Balances for Chemical Engineers, published on line (October 21, 2010). [REQUIRED].

References and Resources:

Chemical Engineering Progress

Chemical Engineering Science – guidelines for manuscript preparation and author instructions

TTU Library (Connect to TTU Library)

Propagation of Error

Uncertainties and Error Propagation

Why Variances Add

MathCad Tutorial

Pre-course Survey

Mole-SI blog

MoLE-SI Login Instructions

Critical Thinking Resources

            YouTube Video on Critical Thinking

            Our Critical Thinking Goals

            Our Critical Thinking Checklist

            The Critical Thinking Community

                        College and University Students

SAFETY POLICY AND REQUIREMENTS

Safety Policy (You will be required to pass an in-class quiz on this information)

On-linen Training

Go to the following link (http://www.tntech.edu/safety/training/), follow instructions and complete each module.  Once complete, print or download your certificate of completion and place in our course drop box at: TBD.  You are to complete these modules by October 27, 2013.  If you complete them later, your grade for this element of the course will be reduced by 20%.  Your safety training score will be 5% of the overall course grade.  NO COURSE GRADE WILL BE GIVEN UNLESS ALL MODULES ARE COMPLETED WITH A SATISFACTORY SCORE ON THE MODULE QUIZ!

Haz Com 12

Lab Safety

RCRA

PPE

CATALOGUE INFORMATION

CHE 2011. Chemical and Biological Engineering Process Analysis. Lec. 3. Lab. 2. Credit 4.
Prerequisites: ENGR 1120, CHEM 1120, MATH 1910. Quantitative descriptions of chemical and biological engineering systems. Conservation of mass and energy for single and multi-process units as well as for reactive and non-reactive systems. Lab introduces report writing and basic measurement techniques.

OBJECTIVES (what the course intends to achieve)

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

Outcomes (what students should learn):

Outcomes have been mapped to ABET Criterion 3.

  1. Criterion 3a (minor) - an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to problems involving mass balance.
  2. Criterion 3b (Major) - an ability to design and conduct experiments as well as analyze results
  3. Criterion 3d (minor)  - an ability to work on a team
  4. Criterion 3e (Major)  - an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems related to mass balance.
  5. Criterion 3g (minor) - an ability to communicate effectively.
  6. Criterion 3k (minor) - an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice as they relate to mass balance problems.

Requirements (what will be measured/assessed):

  1. Participation in all in-classroom and out-of-classroom activities.
  2. Completion of all projects including a final report and final presentation of results.
  3. Completion of all mid-term exams and one final exam.
  4. Completion of all homework assignments.

Performance Criteria (mapping the requirements to the outcomes):

  1. Exams, homework and projects will be used to measure the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering to a wide range of introductory-level chemical engineering problems.
  2. Projects will be used to assess students’ ability to design, conduct and analyze experimental data.
  3. Projects will be used to assess students’ ability to work on a team.
  4. Components of all four requirements will be used to measure the ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  5. Participation in in-classroom and out-of-classroom activities, the project, examinations and homework will be used to measure the ability to communicate effectively.
  6. The Project and homework assignments will be used to measure the ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice as it relates to problems in the chemical industry.

Assessment (how student performance will be assessed):

Each requirement will be assessed using one or more of the performance criteria. The following table maps the relationship between Outcomes, Requirements and Performance Criteria:

Assessment Mapping

 Outcome

Performance Criterion

  Requirement

 1. Criteria 3a: knowledge

1

 2, 3, 4

 2. Criteria 3b: experimentation

2

2

 3. Criteria 3d: teamwork

3

2

 4. Criteria 3e: formulation

4

 1, 2, 3, 4

 5. Criteria 3g: communication

5

 1, 2, 3, 4

 6. Criteria 3k: tools

6

 2, 4

 

 

 

 How Requirements are Mapped to Criteria

 Requirement

 Criterion 3a

Knowledge

Criterion 3b

Experiment

Criterion 3d

Teamwork

 Criterion 3e

Formulation

 Criterion 3g

Communication

 Criterion 3k

Tools

 1. Participation

 

 

 

 

 

 2. Project

X

X

X

X

X

X

 3. Exams

X

 

 

X

X

 4. Homework

X

 

 

X

X

X

5.   Safety

X

 

Since each requirement has several performance criteria mapped to it, each requirement will be assessed in several ways. For example, since exams (requirement 3) map to performance criterion (a, e and g), each exam will have four scores assessing and measuring the students' ability to:

  1. (Criterion 3a) apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering to problems involving mass balances
  2.  (Criterion 3e) identify, formulate and solve engineering problems related to mass balances
  3. (Criterion 3g) communicate effectively

Similarly, each of the other four requirements will be assessed against their respective ABET outcomes.

All requirements will be graded by the instructor or qualified teaching assistants.

GRADING

Requirement

CHE 2011

Homework

10%

Projects

20%

Attendance and Classroom Participation

5%

Exams

mid-terms (5)

final

 

40%

20%

Safety

5%

TOTAL

100%

Grades may be adjusted accordingly based on group performance. Relative weight between homework, projects, attendance and exams may also vary depending upon group performance.

COURSE OUTLINE (mandatory readings and nominal schedule)

* Readings will be assigned on an ongoing basis at the beginning of each new text chapter being covered. Readings should be done on an ongoing basis as we move though the course materials.

Note that: (bio) indicates a biological system; (comp) indicates that some form of computer program or tool must be used; in some cases special instructions are also given in the parenthesis, i.e. (solve using MathCad or MatLab or a software of your choice)

 

Date

Reading/Text Chapter

Assigned

Topic

Homework/Project Due

Lecture Notes

Aug 26

Ch 1 and 2

Mass conservation; Units; Unit conversion; Mathematical preliminaries

Activity No. 1

 

27

 

Lab Safety

 

 

28

 

 

Units Preliminaries

29

 

Lab Safety

 

 

30

 

Quiz No. 1

What is gc?

Sep 2

Labor Day (NO CLASS)

Ch 3

Mass conservation for single component systems

 

3

 

Lab Learning about teams

Safety Quiz (during lab session)

 

4

 

 

Homework: 1-1; 2-1 through 2-24; use MathCad to solve 2-22, 2-23 and 2-24

Total Mass 001

Total Mass 002

5

 

Lab Learning about teams

Safety Quiz (during lab session)

Teamwork I

6

 

 

Quiz No. 2

On Multiple Integration 001

On Multiple Integration 002

9

 

 

Macroscopic Eq. of Mass Continuity 001

Macroscopic Eq. of Mass Continuity 002

10

 

Lab Introduction to experimental problem solving

Project No. 1, Due Oct 7

Teamwork II

Functional Resume Template

11

 

 

Flow in Pipe Example 001

Flow in Pipe Example 002

12

 

Lab Introduction to experimental problem solving

 

 

13

 

 

Exam No. 1 – Ch 1 & 2

 

16

Ch 4

Mass conservation for multicomponent systems

Applying Mass Continuity 001 and 002

17

 

Propagation of Error I

18

 

 

Non-uniform flow field 001

Non-uniform flow field 002

19

 

Propagation of Error I

20

 

Quiz No. 3, Homework 3-1, 3-2, 3-3, 3-5, 3-8

Tank Filling 001

Tank Filling 002

23

 

 

Single Component Balance 001

Single Component Balance 002

24

 

Lab Propagation of Error

Propagation of Error II

25

 

 

 

Single Component Balance 001

Single Component Balance 002

26

 

Lab Propagation of Error

Propagation of Error II

27

 

 

Quiz No. 4, Homework 3-10, 3-12 and 3-15(bio)

Solution to This Week’s Quiz

30

 

 

Multi-Component Preliminaries 001

Multi-Component Preliminaries 002

Oct 1

 

Lab Critical Thinking Lab

Lab Quiz on Propagation of Error

Solution to Lab Quiz

2

 

 

 

The Multi-Component Eq of Continuity 001

The Multi-Component Eq of Continuity 001

3

 

Lab Critical Thinking Lab

Lab Quiz on Propagation of Error

Solution to Lab Quiz

4

Ch 5

Systems involving gases and liquids

Quiz No. 5,  Homework: 4-2 through 4-7

Degrees of Freedom 001

Degrees of Freedom 002

7

 

 

Project No. 1 Due

 

Problem 7-13 001

Problem 7-13 002

8

 

 

 

Critical Thinking I

9

 

 

 

Averaging 001

Averaging 002

10

 

 

 

Critical Thinking I

11

TA

 

Ch 3,  Homework: 4-12, 4-13, 4-18

Other Constraints 001

Other Constraints 002

14

Fall Break (NO CLASS)

 

 

15

Fall Break (NO CLASS)

 

 

 

16

 

 

Exam No. 2 – Ch 3

 

17

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

Homework: 4-19 through 4-22, 4-26, and 4-28 (solve using MathCad)

Problem 4-28 001

Problem 4-28 002

21

Ch 6

Systems involving chemical reaction (Part I)

DF for Closed System 001

DF for Closed System 002

22

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

Equilibrium Closed and Open 001

Equilibrium Closed and Open 002

24

 

 

 

 

25

 

 

Quiz No. 6

 

28

 

 

Exam No. 3 Ch 4

 

29

 

 

 

Lab Notes

30

 

 

Homework: 5-25, 5-32, Handout

Stoichiometry I 001

Stoichiometry I 002

31

 

Lab Notes

Nov 1

 

 

Quiz No. 7

Stoichiometry II 001 and 002

4

 

Systems involving chemical reaction (Part II)

Project No. 2 Proposal

Stoichiometry III 001 and 002

Stoichiometry Example II 001 and 002

5

 

 

 

Linear Algebra Lesson

Linerar Algebra Lesson MathCad

6

 

 

 

MathCad Stoichiometry Lesson 001 and 002

7

 

 

 

Linear Algebra Lesson MathCad

8

 

 

Quiz No. 8

Extending the Formalism 001 and 002

MathCad Steam Reforming Example

11

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

Problem 7.1

14

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

Quiz No. 9

Practice Exam

18

 

 

Exam No. 4 -  Ch 5 (equilibrium formalism),

 

19

 

 

 

Lab Notes

20

 

 

Lecture Notes 001

Lecture Notes 002

Problem 7-14

21

Ch 7

 

 

Lab Notes

22

 

Homework: 7-1, 7-2, 7-4, 7-14

Teamwork Self-Assessment

Practice Exam Ch 6

25

 

 

Exam No. 5 -  Ch 6 (stoichiometry formalism)

 

26

 

 

 

 

27

 

 

Project No. 2 – Full Manuscript

The Splitter 001 and 002

28

 

Thanksgiving Break (NO CLASS)

 

 

 

 

29

Thanksgiving Break (NO CLASS)

 

 

Dec 2

 

 

 

Problem 7-27 001

Problem 7-27 002

3

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

Practice Exam Ch 7 (balances including chemical reaction)

 

5

 

 

 

 

6

Last day of classes

 

Extra Credit Assignment

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dec 9

Section 001 Final Exam (1:00-3:00 pm)

 

Final Exam Ch 1-7

Homework: 7-27, 7-31, 7-35

 

Dec 12

Section 002 Final Exam (1:00-3:00 pm)

 

Final Exam Ch 1-7

Homework: 7-27, 7-31, 7-35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

HOMEWORK SCHEDULE and INSTRUCTIONS

Homework will consist of assigned problems and will be taken very seriously as part of the grade. Problem sets will be assigned ongoing during classroom periods. Problems assigned during any week will be due on the Monday of the following week unless otherwise stated. No credit will be given for late submission of homework. All problems must be solved using appropriate software as specified at the time of assignment. All computer programs must be submitted in electronic via e-mail or on a suitable disc format, i.e. CD.

All homework problems are from the October 21, 2011 version of the text!

Some tips for home works:

Grading your homework:

You homework will be collected on the day it is due.  The TA will give you one point for each problem that has a complete or nearly complete solution regardless of whether or not the problem is correct.  Your paper will be returned to you on the following class (not lab) period.  You will then have until the next class period to grade your own assignment.  Give yourself 10 points for each totally correct answer regardless of the length or complexity of the problem.  A totally correct answer must include the following:

1.      A correct solution with all solution steps shown (8 points)

2.      A correct answer (2 points)

If your answer is wrong, your score falls to 8 point.  If any part of the solution is wrong, then give yourself partial credit according to what fraction of the solution you have correct.

The TA will audit your self-grading and you will be notified if you are too liberal or too strict.  If you are habitually too liberal, the instructor will be notified.

PROJECTS

Project No. 1 – Safety Survey

Project No. 2 – Mass Continuity for a System Containing One Component

Project No. 3 – optional at the discretion of the instructor

Project Requirements:

All projects will require some form of written and oral report.  If a computer program is required, submit a hard copy of your model output along with a disc.

Assessment of the Project:

Your project will be assessed for communications (10%), knowledge (15%), formulation (15%), experimentation (40 %), use of computer tools (15% where applicable else the breakdown will be renormalized) and your ability to work effectively as a team member (5%).

EXAMS

Each exam will have questions pertaining to basic knowledge, formulation and communication.

All exams will be open book and open note. Only the final will be comprehensive. There may be a take-home exam.

QUIZZES

Quizzes will be given every Friday unless an exam or other major project is due.  The sum of all quiz scores will be included as a “mid-term” and so are part of the 45% allocated for “Exams.”

DOWNLOAD SOFTWARE AND DATA FOR HOMEWORKS AND PROJECTS

When required, data and software will be posted at this site with links provided below. Please report any problem to me at once, mailto:jbiernacki@tntech.edu.  To download, right click on the item and “Save Target As.” 

Safety Procedures

Mole-si Login Instructions

Homework Solutions

Chapter

Links

1 and 2

 

Homework Set No. 1

3

 

Homework Set No. 2

3

 

Homework Set No. 3

4

 

Homework Set No. 4

4

 

Homework Set No. 5

4

 

Homework Set No. 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture and Lab Notes (Fall 2012):

August 27, 2012

August 29, 2012

September 4, 2012 Lab

September 5, 2012

September 7, 2012

Homework No. 1 Solution

September 10, 2012

September 11, 2012 Lab

September 12, 2012

Quiz No. 1 Answer Key

September 13, 2012 Lab

September 17, 2012

September 18, 2012 Lab

September 19, 2012

September 20, 2012

September 21, 2012

September 24, 2012.pdf

September 25, 2012 Lab (MathCad File Error Analysis Example)

Homework No. 3 Solution

September 26, 2012

September 28, 2012

October 1, 2012

October 2,2012 Lab

October 3, 2012

October 4, 2012 Lab

October 5, 2012

October 10, 2012

October 22, 2012

October 24, 2012

Homework No. 4 Solution

October 29 and 31, 2012

Homework Problems 4-12, 4-13 and 4-18

Homework Problems 4-19, 4-22, 4-26 and 4-28

Homework Problems All,  Handout Part II, 5-25, 5-32 and Handout Part I

November 5, 2012

November 26, 2012

Homework Problems 7-1, 7-2, 7-4 and 7-14 (for .rtf versions download 7-1.rtf, 7-2.rtf, 7-4.rtf and 7-14.rtf, this format can be opened with a word processor such as Word)

November 30-December 7, 2012; Problem 7-31 Partial Solution

Lecture and Lab Notes (Fall 2011):

August 29, 2011

Sept 12, 2011

Exam No. 1 Outline

Sept 26, 2011

Homework No. 3 Solution Set

Oct 3, 2011

Oct 10, 2011

Homework No. 4 Solution Set

Homework No. 5 Solution Set

Homework Ch7 1st Set

Oct 17, 2011

Oct 24, 2011

Nov 14, 2011

Nov 18, 2011

Nov 21, 2011

Nov 28, 2011

Lecture Notes (Fall 2010):

August 31, 2010 – Propagation of Error

September 1 and 3, 2010 – First Day of Class

September 20, 2010 – Equation of Mass Continuity

September 22, 2010 – Equation of Mass Continuity: A first example

September 24 and 27, 2010 – Equation of Mass Continuity: Problem 3-5b and the Tank Filling Example

September 29, 2010 – Examples of how to use the Macroscopic Equation of Mass Continuity

October 4, 2010 – Wrapping up the Macroscopic Equation of Mass Continuity and first Exam Study Sheet

October 5, 2010 Lab – Proposal writing

October 6, 2010 – Some definitions before we study the Macroscopic Equation of Mass Continuity for multi-component systems

October 7, 2010 Lab

October 11, 2010

October 15, 2010Particle Dissolution MathCad Model

October 20 and 22, 2010 – Using the Degreed of Freedom formalism

October 21, 2010 Lab

October 26, 2010 lab

October 27 and 29, 2010

November 1, 2010

November 3, 2010

November 4, 2010 Lab

November 5, 2010

November 8, 2010

November 11, 2010 Lab

November 12, 2010

November 16, 2010 LabStoichiometry MathCad

November 17, 2010 – Chapter 6 MathCad Help

November 18, 2010 Lab

November 19, 2010

November 22, 2010

November 24, 2010

November 29, 2010

November 30, 2010 Lab

December 1, 2010

December 2, 2010 Lab

.tif Versions of Lecture Notes (Fall 2010):

August 31, 2010 – Error Propogation

September 1, 2010 – Units, Force…

September 7, 2010 – In-class activity notes

September 8, 2010 – In-class activity notes

September 8a, 2010 – In-class activity notes

September 9, 2010 – In-class activity notes

September 10, 2010 – Problem 2-14

September 15, 2010 – Averaging, Area Integration, etc. MathCad for Surface and Volume Integration, MathCad Problem 3-2a

Exam Solutions

Solution to First Exam

Lecture Notes (Fall 2009):

September 21, 2009

September 23, 2009

September 25, 2009

September 28, 2009

September 29, 2009

September 30, 2009 and MathCad supplement to September 29 course notes

October 2, 2009 and Excel supplement and MathCad supplement

October 5, 2009 – Exam No. 2 Study Sheet

October 12, 2009

October 14, 2009 – Degrees of Freedom (DF) Formalism

October 16, 2009 – DF Application

October 21, 2009 – Area Integration and DF Application

October 23, 2009 – Problem No. 4-28

October 26, 2009 – Exam No. 3 Study Sheet and Some Review

October 28, 2009 – Equilibrium – Some Preliminary Definitions

November 2, 2009 – Equilibrium and The Intensive Problem

November 3, 2009 Lab Notes

November 4, 2009 – Binary Vapor-Liquid-Equilibrium and the Intensive Problem Continued

November 5, 2009 Lab Notes

November 6, 2009 – Binary Vapor-Liquid-Equilibrium and the Extensive Problem

Week of November 9, 2009 Lab Activity, Mass Spec Dataset

November 9, 2009 – Complex Stoichiometry (Solving by Inspection) and Quiz No. 1 Study Sheet, MathCad Supplement No. 1 for Chapter 6

Problem No. 5-14 Hints

November 11, 2009 – A Bit of Review on the Extensive Problem

November 16, 2009 – Complex Stoichiometry, the Reaction Rate Formalism

November 17, 2009 Lab Notes – Linear Algebra Basics and the Reaction Schemata

November 18, 2009 – The Reaction Rate Formalism

November 23, 2009 – The Reaction Rate Formalism and Example Problem

November 30 and December 2, 2009 – The reaction Rate Formalism, Example Completed and Quize No. 2 Study Sheet

December 7, 2009 – Top Ten final Exam Topics and Review of Error Analysis

December 11, 2009 – Review of the Intensive and Extensive Problem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J. J. Biernacki – August 24, 2010